Dating wedgewood jasperware

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The earliest jasper was stained throughout and was known as "solid," but by 1829 production in jasper had virtually ceased.

In 1844 production resumed using items coloured only on the surface and known as "dip." Solid jasper was not manufactured again until 1860.

Jasperware was originally developed by Josiah Wedgwood during the mid-1700s.

The Wedgwood pottery was one of the most far-thinking companies of its time, quick to take advantage of new decorating trends, notably, in this case, copies of pieces found by early archeologists digging Greek and Roman ruins.

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According to Reilly all black basalt made from 1769-1780 was either unmarked, or had this mark; however this is by no means certain; see the following paragraph.Jasperware was matte finish pottery product (some refer to it as porcelain) developed by Josiah Wedgwood and used to imitate onyx or sardonyx in that it had a background color (usually blue, but not always) with the white design in relief.Jasperware was originally developed by Josiah Wedgwood during the mid-1700s and took advantage of new decorating trends, notably, in this case, copies of pieces found by early archeologists digging Greek and Roman ruins.While the 18th- and 19th-century examples of Wedgwood Jasperware are sought after, with rare exceptions, the 20th-century examples are not, which makes identifying when a piece was made of utmost importance.The more modern versions can be quickly identified if you know what to look for.

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